September 24, 2004

Countdown to Electoral Uprising -- 39 Days to Go -- JFK hits hard on Bush terrror blunders, DeLay scandal HIDDEN by Corporatist Media, Theresa expect Osama's "capture, " Klinghoffer's murder, Pentagon vote supression foiled

There are only 39 days to go until the national
referendum on the COMPETENCE, CHARACTER and
CREDIBILITY of the _resident and the VICE
_resident...The botched, bungled, mis-named "war on
terrorism" is not the strength of the Bush
abomination, it is the SHAME of the Bush
abomination...There is an Electoral Uprising
coming...Do not be disceived, discouraged or confused
by the US regimestream news media, with its cooked
polls and craven propapunditgandists...There is an
Electoral Uprising coming in November 2004. It will
include many life-long Reublicans from US military
families in Red States, it will include many patrios
of diverse political view points...The US regimestream
news media, at least until this point, has, in large
part, been a full partner along with the Bush Cabal
and its wholly-owned-subsidiary
formerluy-known-as-the-Republican-Party
in a Triad of shared special interest (e.g. oil,
weapons, media, pharmaceuticals, tobacco, etc.) Here
are five very important news items. They should
dominate the air waves and demand headlines above the
fold. But they won't. Please read them and share them
with others. Please vote and encourage others to vote.
Please remember that the US regimestream news media
does not want to inform you about this presidential
campaign, it wants to DISinform you...


Mary Dalrymple, Associated Press: "The invasion of
Iraq was a profound diversion from the battle against
our greatest enemy, al-Qaida," Kerry said in a speech
at Temple University. "There's just no question about
it. The president's misjudgment, miscalculation and
mismanagement of the war in Iraq all make the war on
terror harder to win."
Kerry said Iraq has become a haven for terrorists
since the war, and he offered a detailed strategy to
contain terrorism while drawing a sharp distinction
between his and the president's views on national
security.
"George Bush made Saddam Hussein the priority. I
would have made Osama bin Laden the priority," Kerry
said. "I will finish the job in Iraq and I will
refocus our energies on the real war on terror."

www.democrats.com: SPEAK UP AMERICA! Networks Black
Out Story of Tom Delay Group Fraud Case
The networks spend DAYS giving big chunks of news time
to unsubstantiated, often "anonymous" slams against
Kerry or to dubious documents that could hurt Bush.
But they did not give ONE SINGLE MINUTE to a fraud
case involving one of the most powerful men in
Washington, Tom Delay. As Media Matters reports: "On
September 21, three top aides to U.S. House Majority
Leader Tom DeLay (R-TX) were indicted on charges of
illegally raising political funds from corporations in
2002. Major newspapers carried the story, some of them
on the front page....Yet ABC World News Tonight, CBS
Evening News, and NBC Nightly News failed to report
the indictments on September 21 and on September 22."
Once again, the Networks are deceiving the public,
hiding info about the Republican Party, while
systematically seeking to undermine the Democrats.
This amounts to attempted subversion of the American
political process. Contact these corporations and
DEMAND JUSTICE

Mike Sunnucks, Business Journal of Phoenix: In regard
to the hunt for terror leader Osama Bin Laden, Heinz
Kerry said she could see the al-Qaida chief being
caught before the November election.
"I wouldn't be surprised if he appeared in the next
month," said Heinz Kerry, alluding to a possible
capture by United States and allied forces before
election day.
The spouse of Democratic presidential candidate John
Kerry also hit President Bush on Iraq, saying it
should not be equated with anti-terrorism efforts and
that the current administration chose to create a
"hotbed for terrorism" in Iraq when dictator Saddam
Hussein did not pose an immediate threat. Heinz Kerry
also said she agrees with her husband that a military
draft may be reinstated under Bush.
She said she was embarrassed to receive tax cuts
advocated by Bush and supports her husband's efforts
to roll them back for higher incomes and use those
funds for education, health care and deficit
reduction.

Sidney Blumenthal, Salon: In his stump speech,
repeated word for word across the country, Bush says
that he invaded Iraq because of "the lesson of
September the 11th." WMD go unmentioned; now the only
reason Bush offers is Saddam Hussein as an agent of
terrorism. "He was a sworn enemy of the United States
of America; he had ties to terrorist networks. Do you
remember Abu Nidal? He's the guy that killed Leon
Klinghoffer. Leon Klinghoffer was murdered because of
his religion. Abu Nidal was in Baghdad, as was his
organization."
The period of Klinghoffer's murder in 1985 on the
Achille Lauro by Abu Abbas, in fact, coincided with
the period of U.S. courtship of Saddam, marked by the
celebrated visits of Donald Rumsfeld, then Middle East
envoy. The United States actively collaborated with
Iraq in intelligence exchanges and materially
supported Saddam in his decade-long war with Iran
(which ended in 1988), including authorizing the sale
of biological agents for Saddam's laboratories, a
diversification of his WMD capability.

Jennifer Joan Lee, International Herald Tribune: The
U.S. Defense Department changed its explanation
Wednesday for problems faced by certain overseas
Americans attempting to access the government Web site
for voters abroad, saying that an Internet security
block imposed several years ago had been left in place
inadvertently.
The block, which had prevented some U.S. citizens
abroad from accessing www.fvap.gov, the site of the
Federal Voting Assistance Program, as the Nov. 2
election nears, has now been lifted, a Pentagon
spokesman said.
Tim Madden, spokesman for the Defense Department task
force that oversees the Pentagon's computer networks,
declined to specify the reason for the block.

Support Our Troops, Save the US Constitution,
Repudiate the 9/11 Cover-Up and the Iraq War Lies,
Restore Fiscal Responsibility in the White House,
Thwart the Theft of a Second Presidential Election,
Save the Environment, Break the Corporatist
Stranglehold on the US Mainstream News Media, Rescue
the US Supreme Court from Right-Wing Radicals, Cleanse
the White House of the Chicken Hawk Coup and Its
War-Profiteering Cronies, Show Up for Democracy in
2004: Defeat the Triad, Defeat Bush (again!)

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&e=3&u=/ap/20040924/ap_on_el_pr/kerry

Kerry Faults Bush for Pursuing Saddam

2 hours, 50 minutes ago

By MARY DALRYMPLE, Associated Press Writer

PHILADELPHIA - Democratic presidential candidate John
Kerry (news - web sites) faulted President Bush (news
- web sites) on Friday for pursuing Saddam Hussein
(news - web sites) instead of Sept. 11 mastermind
Osama bin Laden (news - web sites), a choice Kerry
contended had made defeating terrorism more difficult.

"The invasion of Iraq (news - web sites) was a
profound diversion from the battle against our
greatest enemy, al-Qaida," Kerry said in a speech at
Temple University. "There's just no question about it.
The president's misjudgment, miscalculation and
mismanagement of the war in Iraq all make the war on
terror harder to win."

Kerry said Iraq has become a haven for terrorists
since the war, and he offered a detailed strategy to
contain terrorism while drawing a sharp distinction
between his and the president's views on national
security.

"George Bush (news - web sites) made Saddam Hussein
the priority. I would have made Osama bin Laden the
priority," Kerry said. "I will finish the job in Iraq
and I will refocus our energies on the real war on
terror."

The Democrat's campaign also rolled out a new ad in
which it uses Bush's words to criticize the incumbent.
The spot shows Bush during a Rose Garden news
conference saying, "I saw a poll that said the 'right
track-wrong track' in Iraq was better than here in
America."


The ad continues: "The right track? Americans are
being kidnapped, held hostage, even beheaded. Over a
thousand American soldiers have died. And George Bush
has no plan to get us out of Iraq."


While campaigning Friday in Lafayette, La., Vice
President Dick Cheney (news - web sites) countered the
Democratic criticism, telling supporters, "John Kerry
is trying to tear down and trash all the good that has
been accomplished."


A day earlier, Kerry told The Columbus Dispatch that
the president's actions in Iraq and elsewhere show
Bush masquerading as a mainstream conservative while
pursuing extremist policies.


"I don't view these people as conservatives," Kerry
said. "I actually view them as extreme, and I think
their policies have been extreme, and that extends all
the way to Iraq, where this president, in my judgment,
diverted the real war on terror which was Osama bin
Laden and al-Qaida and almost obsessively moved to
deal with Iraq in a way that weakened our nation,
overextended our armed forces, cost us $200 billion
and created a breach in our oldest alliances."


Kerry also mentioned a blurring line between the
separation of church and state and the growth of
federal budget deficits.


To douse the spread of terrorism, Kerry proposed
policies aimed at denying individuals and groups the
ability to organize and attack. Kerry said he would
build a better military and intelligence apparatus to
go after enemies, deny terrorists weapons and
financing, move against worldwide terrorist havens and
recruitment centers, and promote freedom and democracy
in Muslim nations.


The Bush-Cheney campaign said the president is already
following that course. "He is copying the president's
plan at the same time he is attacking the president,"
said spokesman Steve Schmidt.


Kerry has repeatedly argued that the war in Iraq has
distracted attention and resources from the pursuit of
terrorists, including bin Laden.


The Bush-Cheney campaign said Kerry has held
conflicting positions on that point. They point to
instances where Kerry said the former Iraqi leader
acted like a terrorist and said that the war on
terrorism should be seen as an operation bigger than
the conflict in Afghanistan (news - web sites).


Kerry visited the Pennsylvania battleground before a
quick trip home to Boston and then several days spent
preparing for the presidential debates. Kerry told the
Dispatch that he has to present himself "clearly,
forcefully to the American people with a clear set of
priorities."


"I think a lot of people will tune in," he said.
"There are undecideds. A lot of folks will try to
measure our character and our vision, so I think it's
an important moment."


___


SPEAK UP AMERICA! Networks Black Out Story of Tom
Delay Group Fraud Case
The networks spend DAYS giving big chunks of news time
to unsubstantiated, often "anonymous" slams against
Kerry or to dubious documents that could hurt Bush.
But they did not give ONE SINGLE MINUTE to a fraud
case involving one of the most powerful men in
Washington, Tom Delay. As Media Matters reports: "On
September 21, three top aides to U.S. House Majority
Leader Tom DeLay (R-TX) were indicted on charges of
illegally raising political funds from corporations in
2002. Major newspapers carried the story, some of them
on the front page....Yet ABC World News Tonight, CBS
Evening News, and NBC Nightly News failed to report
the indictments on September 21 and on September 22."
Once again, the Networks are deceiving the public,
hiding info about the Republican Party, while
systematically seeking to undermine the Democrats.
This amounts to attempted subversion of the American
political process. Contact these corporations and
DEMAND JUSTICE

http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=36732

Ethics Coalition: Texas Indictments Make DeLay Ethics
Investigation More Urgent

9/22/2004 3:47:00 PM


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To: National Desk

Contact: Mark Glaze, 202-271-0982, Melanie Sloan,
202-588-5565, both of the Congressional Ethics
Coalition

WASHINGTON, Sept. 22 /U.S. Newswire/ -- The
Congressional Ethics Coalition, an ideologically
diverse coalition of eight leading government reform
organizations, released the following statement
regarding the indictment of several top aides to House
Majority Leader Tom DeLay. The Coalition is working
for meaningful reform of congressional ethics
oversight rules.

The coalition members are the Campaign Legal Center,
the Center for Responsive Politics, Citizens for
Responsibility and Ethics in Government, Common Cause,
Democracy 21, Judicial Watch, Public Campaign and
Public Citizen.

---

"The indictment of three top aides to House Majority
Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) makes it even more urgent
for the House Ethics Committee to investigate whether
Mr. DeLay played a role in allegedly illegal
fundraising by committees he directly controlled.

"The Ethics Committee has a clear responsibility to
investigate whether Mr. DeLay violated ethics rules in
the course of his leadership of TRMPAC and ARMPAC,
both of which are the subject of the criminal
indictments announced yesterday in Texas.

"The aides charged included the director of Texans for
a Republican Majority and two key fundraisers for the
committee, which Mr. DeLay helped create and on whose
advisory board he served. The executive director of
Mr. DeLays own PAC, Americans for a Republican
Majority, was also charged.

"If these charges do not persuade the Ethics Committee
that there is sufficient evidence to at least open an
investigation into the pending DeLay matter, it is
almost impossible to imagine what would.

"If the Ethics Committee chooses to ignore the
indictment of three individuals serving at the
pleasure of Mr. DeLay and directly reporting to him,
then it is clear that the Committee has abdicated its
constitutional responsibility to enforce ethical
standards in the House.

"Earlier this week, Ethics Committee Chairman Joel
Hefley (R- Colo.) and ranking member Rep. Alan
Mollohan (D-W.V.) -- apparently unable to agree on how
to address allegations of improper fundraising by Mr.
DeLay -- said that they would ask the full committee
to decide whether to open an investigation. Pushing
that decision off to the 10-member committee sets up
the likelihood the members will deadlock on a 5-to-5
vote, which would result in the matter being dropped
entirely.

"Once again, we strongly urge the House Ethics
Committee to open an inquiry into the allegations in
the complaint brought by Rep. Chris Bell (D-Texas)
against Mr. DeLay. Anything else would be
irresponsible conduct by the Committee and would
require the full House to take action to override the
Committee."

http://www.usnewswire.com/

-0-

/ 2004 U.S. Newswire 202-347-2770/


http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2004/09/20/daily58.html?page=2

The Business Journal of Phoenix - September 23, 2004
http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2004/09/20/daily58.html

LATEST NEWS
1:48 PM MST Thursday
Heinz Kerry helps Democrats raise $1M at Phoenix event
Mike Sunnucks
The Business Journal
Arizona Democrats raked in more than $1 million
Wednesday night at a fund-raiser headlined by Teresa
Heinz Kerry.

Heinz Kerry criticized the Bush administration on tax
cuts, Iraq and the war on terrorism at the event,
which was held at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa.

In regard to the hunt for terror leader Osama Bin
Laden, Heinz Kerry said she could see the al-Qaida
chief being caught before the November election.

"I wouldn't be surprised if he appeared in the next
month," said Heinz Kerry, alluding to a possible
capture by United States and allied forces before
election day.

The spouse of Democratic presidential candidate John
Kerry also hit President Bush on Iraq, saying it
should not be equated with anti-terrorism efforts and
that the current administration chose to create a
"hotbed for terrorism" in Iraq when dictator Saddam
Hussein did not pose an immediate threat. Heinz Kerry
also said she agrees with her husband that a military
draft may be reinstated under Bush.

She said she was embarrassed to receive tax cuts
advocated by Bush and supports her husband's efforts
to roll them back for higher incomes and use those
funds for education, health care and deficit
reduction.

Bush Southwestern campaign spokesman Danny Diaz hit
the Kerry campaign on both the Iraq and draft issues.
Diaz said the Kerry camp is "irresponsible" for
bringing up the draft issue and contends the Democrat
is doing it for political gain.

Diaz also criticized Kerry for shifting positions on
Iraq on the campaign trail after voting to authorize
military action in 2002.

"Arizonans need a president they can count on, a
leader who knows what he believes, and after reading
the morning's paper, doesn't shift his stance to
accommodate the opposition," Diaz said.

The Biltmore event was the largest single fund-raising
event by state Democrats, displaying the prowess on
that front by state party chairman Jim Pederson and
Gov. Janet Napolitano.

Several of the main sponsors of the fund-raiser
included groups that often clash with business
interests.

That list includes the Arizona Trial Lawyers
Association, Arizona AFL-CIO, United Food and
Commercial Workers Union and the American Federation
of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Business interests view litigation reforms to reduce
class action and frivolous lawsuits as a top issue in
Bush's favor.

Groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and
National Federation of Independent Business are not
pleased with Kerry's pick of North Carolina Sen. John
Edwards, a former trial lawyer and opponent of
business-backed tort reform, as his running mate.

Kerry also has not backed business efforts on
litigation reforms. Bush supports tort reforms.

Pederson, a Valley shopping center developer, has made
fund-raising a top priority as Democratic state
chairman. That includes making significant
contributions himself and reaching out with Napolitano
to moderate business executives.

Democratic spokeswoman Sarah Rosen said none of the
money for the $1 million Wednesday event came from
Pederson.

Pederson is expected to challenge GOP U.S. Sen. Jon
Kyl in 2006.

There were some business lobbyists at the Heinz Kerry
event, including officials and lobbyists from Pinnacle
West Capital Corp., Wells Fargo Bank and the Home
Builders Association of Arizona.

The event was held the same day it was announced the
Kerry campaign was nixing plans to run homestretch ads
in Arizona. Kerry's team had planned to begin running
ads again on local stations in Phoenix and Tucson but
has opted not to, bolstering GOP confidence.

Recent Arizona polls show Bush leading Kerry in the
state by 6 to 11 percentage points.

Kerry Arizona campaign spokeswoman Sue Walitsky said
Arizona voters still will see national cable ads, and
the state still is a priority in terms of grassroots
efforts.

"There is no surrender here," Walitsky said.

Arizona Republican Party Chairman Bob Fannin said the
Biltmore fund-raiser will end up going to other
battleground states and not Arizona.

"The Arizona Democratic Party has become little more
than an ATM for the national Democrats," said Fannin.
"Democrats have realized that Napolitano's election
and Jim Pederson's soft money are not enough to save
the Kerry campaign in Arizona."

2004 American City Business Journals Inc.

Web reprint information


All contents of this site American City Business
Journals Inc. All rights reserved.

http://www.truthout.org/docs_04/092404J.shtml

The Bubble Boy
By Sidney Blumenthal
Salon.com

Thursday 23 September 2004

Bush lives in a world immune from the realities of
Iraq.
The news is grim, but the president is
"optimistic." The intelligence is sobering, but he
tosses aside "pessimistic predictions." His opponent
says he has "no credibility," but the president
replies that it is his rival who is "twisting in the
wind." The secretary general of the United Nations
speaks of the "rule of law," but Bush talks before a
mute General Assembly of "a new definition of
security." Between the rhetoric and the reality lies
the campaign.

A reliable source who has just returned after
assessing the facts on the ground for U.S.
intelligence services told me that in Iraq, U.S.
commanders have plans for this week and the next, but
that there is "no overarching strategy." The New York
Times reports an offensive is in the works to capture
the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah - after the
election. In the meantime, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and
other al-Qaida-linked terrorists operate from there at
will, as they have for more than a year. The president
speaks of new Iraqi security forces, but not even half
of the U.S. personnel have been assigned to the
headquarters of the Multinational Security Transition
Command.

Bush's vision of the liberation of Iraq as the
restaging of the liberation of France - justified by
his unearthing of Saddam Hussein's fearful weapons of
mass destruction; paid for by the flow of cheap oil;
and leading to the establishment of democracy, regime
change in Iran and Syria, and the quiescence of
stunned Palestinians - has melted before harsh facts.
But reality cannot be permitted to obscure the image.
The liberation is "succeeding," he insists, and only
pessimists cannot see it.

In July, the CIA delivered to the president a new
National Intelligence Estimate that details three
gloomy scenarios of the future of Iraq ranging up to
civil war. Perhaps it was his reading of the NIE that
prompted Bush to remark in August that the war on
terrorism could not be won, a judgment he swiftly
reversed. But at the United Nations, Bush held a press
conference at which he rebuffed the latest
intelligence: "The CIA laid out a - several scenarios
that said life could be lousy, life could be OK, life
could be better. And they were just guessing as to
what the conditions might be like."

With that, Bush explained that for him
intelligence is not to be used to inform decision
making but to be accepted or rejected to advance an
ideological and political agenda. His dismissal is an
affirmation of the politicization and corruption of
intelligence that rationalized the war.

In his stump speech, repeated word for word across
the country, Bush says that he invaded Iraq because of
"the lesson of September the 11th." WMD go
unmentioned; now the only reason Bush offers is Saddam
Hussein as an agent of terrorism. "He was a sworn
enemy of the United States of America; he had ties to
terrorist networks. Do you remember Abu Nidal? He's
the guy that killed Leon Klinghoffer. Leon Klinghoffer
was murdered because of his religion. Abu Nidal was in
Baghdad, as was his organization."

The period of Klinghoffer's murder in 1985 on the
Achille Lauro by Abu Abbas, in fact, coincided with
the period of U.S. courtship of Saddam, marked by the
celebrated visits of Donald Rumsfeld, then Middle East
envoy. The United States actively collaborated with
Iraq in intelligence exchanges and materially
supported Saddam in his decade-long war with Iran
(which ended in 1988), including authorizing the sale
of biological agents for Saddam's laboratories, a
diversification of his WMD capability.

The reason was not out of idealism but necessity:
the threat of an expansive, Iranian-controlled Shiite
fundamentalism to the entire Gulf.

The policy of courting Saddam continued until his
invasion of Kuwait. But the policy of realpolitik
prevailed when U.S. forces held back from capturing
Baghdad for larger geostrategic reasons. The first
Bush administration grasped that in potential future
wars after the Cold War, the United States required ad
hoc coalitions to share the military burden and
financial cost. Going to Baghdad would have violated
the U.N.-sanctioning resolution that gave legitimacy
to the first Gulf War as well as created a nightmare
of "Lebanonization," as then-Secretary of State James
Baker called it.

Realism prevailed; Saddam's power was subdued and
drastically reduced. It was the greatest
accomplishment of the first President Bush. When he
honored the U.N. resolution, the credibility of the
United States in the region was enormously enhanced,
enabling serious movement on the languishing Middle
East peace process. Now the second President Bush has
undone the foundation of his father's work, which was
built upon by President Clinton.

The success of Bush's campaign depends on the
containment of any contrary perception of reality. He
must evade, deny and suppress it. His true opponent is
not his Democratic foe - called unpatriotic and the
candidate of al-Qaida by the vice president - but
events. Bush's latest vision is his shield against
them. He invokes the power of positive thinking, as
taught by Emile Coue, guru of cheerful auto-suggestion
in the giddy 1920s, before the crash, who urged mental
improvement through the constant repetition of "Every
day in every way I am getting better and better."

It was during this era of illusion that T.S. Eliot
wrote "The Hollow Men": Between the idea / And the
reality / Between the motion / And the act / Falls the
Shadow."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sidney Blumenthal, a former assistant and senior
advisor to President Clinton and the author of "The
Clinton Wars," is writing a column for Salon and the
Guardian of London.


http://www.iht.com/articles/540149.html

Pentagon lifts block on voter site
Jennifer Joan Lee/IHT IHT
Thursday, September 23, 2004


PARIS The U.S. Defense Department changed its
explanation Wednesday for problems faced by certain
overseas Americans attempting to access the government
Web site for voters abroad, saying that an Internet
security block imposed several years ago had been left
in place inadvertently.

The block, which had prevented some U.S. citizens
abroad from accessing www.fvap.gov, the site of the
Federal Voting Assistance Program, as the Nov. 2
election nears, has now been lifted, a Pentagon
spokesman said.

Tim Madden, spokesman for the Defense Department task
force that oversees the Pentagon's computer networks,
declined to specify the reason for the block.

Earlier, a Pentagon official indicated that the block
had been imposed to thwart hackers, but Madden would
not comment on this.

He insisted, however, that the Pentagon had not been
not blocking the Federal Voting Assistance Program's
site.

Earlier Wednesday, three members of Congress wrote to
Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld warning that the
block could result in "the potential
disenfranchisement of millions of overseas Americans"
and urging him to restore access to the site.

News that access to the voting assistance site was
restricted, first reported in the International Herald
Tribune on Monday, infuriated both Democrats and
Republicans.

Both parties want to see a maximum number of voters
abroad register in time to vote in November.

"We've sent a man to the moon, so we should also be
able to safeguard our voter assistance Web sites
without disenfranchising patriotic, tax-paying,
law-abiding Americans," said Representative Carolyn
Maloney, Democrat of New York, one of the three who
wrote to Rumsfeld.

The chairman of Republicans Abroad Europe, Robert
Pingeon, said he did not believe the block had been
politically motivated.

"But I certainly think they could have done a better
job explaining the situation," he said. "The blocks
may have a legitimate reason, but they also complicate
the lives of people trying to register to vote."

According to overseas voter advocates, the block
prevented users of major Internet service providers in
many countries, including Australia, Britain Canada,
China, Czech Republic, France India and Japan, from
accessing www.fvap.gov.

Some users of Wanadoo.fr, a French provider that had
been blocked, said Wednesday that they were now able
to access the site.

Madden, the spokesman for the Pentagon's Joint Task
Force-Global Network Operations, said that the block
had been left in place "inadvertently."

"That block should not have continued past a certain
date," he said. "For technical reasons, that block was
not lifted when it was directed to be lifted." He
declined to elaborate.

The Federal Voting Assistance Program, which was set
up to help American servicemen and civilians overseas
take part in elections, is under the aegis of the
Defense Department.

Madden said the Pentagon computer task force employed
a strategy known as "defense in depth" - "layering
network defenses so that they complement, support and
validate each other.

Blocks, firewalls and antivirus software are only some
of those measures."

He said that "one device within the Department of
Defense" had maintained the block that prevented
certain Internet service providers from accessing the
voting assistance site.

The department's Global Information Grid involves
13,000 different networks and 3.5 million individual
computers, he said.

Madden declined to say when the block was originally
imposed. But Maloney, the Democratic congresswoman,
indicated that it may have been in place when the last
presidential election took place, in 2000.

"It's my understanding that this was a problem four
years ago, they knew it was a problem, and they still
haven't managed to fix it so that Americans overseas
can access the Web site," she said, before the
Pentagon indicated that the block had been lifted.

International Herald Tribune

Copyright 2004 The International Herald Tribune |
www.iht.com



Posted by richard at September 24, 2004 03:02 PM